Orange Peel Inspiration

Now the fun post!  Here’s a few ideas for arranging your orange peel shapes.  If have seen (or sewn) an orange peel project you like, please link to it in the comments!

The traditional way to use orange peels is to applique each one diagonally onto a background square. They can then be sewn together in a myriad of different designs.  When used to fill the entire space, an X and O pattern starts to appear:

IMG_6019

4-patches with alternating plain squares make a flower pattern:

IMG_6018

Playing with where the pattern starts and ends brings out a stronger diagonal pattern:

IMG_6020

especially when you use alternating colors:

And why not put the squares on point?

IMG_6021

One of my favorite things to do with orange peels is to not applique each one to a background square, rather to make free form designs; flowers, feather, scales, all sorts of organic designs can be suggested by this shape. This one I made a couple of years ago now, starting from the corner and working out.

Here’s my recently completed free-form flowers:

And a few more bits and bobs still mostly in the dream-phase:

IMG_6022

IMG_6024

20150912_154459

I’ve also been thinking about combining different sizes to make a more complex flower; if you get to that first please do send me a picture.

This concludes my little series on Orange Peels; Please see the first two posts How to work with Orange Peel Templates and Tutorial: My Applique Stitch, and visit Faraway Road or my Etsy shop if you’d like to purchase Snowflakes Freezer Paper Shapes.  🙂

Have a lovely weekend!

Jessie

Palette Parade- Flowering Cabbage

One thing that really charmed us on our visit to Seattle last month was these adorable flowering cabbages.  They were everywhere, planted in medians and parking lots and flower pots.  We have these back east too once in a while, but by February they are looking pretty haggard.  These were so fresh and lovely.  And my favorite shade of orchid-pink-lavender.

Fabric Images courtesy of eQuilter.com  1.Lush – Tossed Leaves – Candy Pink 2. Fun Filaments – Candy Pink 3.Japanese Import – Whitewash – Sampler Style – Eggshell 4.Cool Weave – Charcoal 5.Kona -Snow 6.Salt Water – Tortoise Shell – Ivory 7.Dakota – Ikat Yarn Dye Square & Linear Patterns – Natural/Black 8.Kaffe Fassett “Shot” Cotton – Bamboo 9.Fun Filaments – Hunter Green 10.Sateen Solids – Opulent Cotton – Jungle Green 11.Urban Cosmos – Flower Filigree – Pear Green 12.Japanese Scallops – Dk Green

I have been wanting to make a spiderweb quilt for a long time.  After one disastrous attempt at using true scraps, I realized that I would need to actually plan my color scheme in order to like my final project.  This would be so fun to make!  I would use really thin strings and not try to keep them rigidly straight, but not make them intentionally wonky, either.  Just enough variation to show the human hand.  Of course I would make it scrappier than this mock-up.  This pattern just begs to be made scrappy.

I would also love to just make a pile of cushions, each one a variation of this block, in all different sizes.

My fabric images this time are courtesy of eQuilter.com.  I divide my fabric money pretty evenly between eQuilter and Pink Chalk, so I am thrilled that they have both given me permission to use their images for this feature!  Going forward I’ll be switching between the two.

Work in Progress Wednesday

I’m so excited about my two newest works in progress- because new projects are so much more fun than already-in-progress projects 🙂

I cut both of these out over the past week.

This one is all my own fabric in the green and blue colorways that I haven’t really used yet- plus lots of light solid triangles.  It’s going up on the design wall this week.

This one isn’t getting design wall-ed.  I like having something I can sew together without thinking right now.   The Heather Ross piggies were my jumping-off point when choosing my fabrics.  It combines a few of my fabrics with a bunch that I “had” to buy because they matched my fabric, but it still needs something… maybe a warmer reddish-pink?  I’ll look around next time I get down into the fabric dungeon.

Linking up to WiP Wednesday at Freshly Pieced

Palette Parade: Red and White

This is cheating.  Does one color plus white really equal a palette?  I don’t know, but I have always loved the classic red and white quilts, so I’m giving myself a pass.

eadcf033c739

image source: decorpad.com

What I love is that, a red and white quilt made 100 years ago looks just as fresh as one made this year- and it’s often hard to tell from photos if a red and white quilt is old or new.

Did you hear about the fabulous exhibit of red and white quilts that the American Folk Art Museum put on in NYC back in 2011?  These 650 quilts are all from the collection of Joanna Rose and, if I remember correctly, the exhibition was a gift from her husband to celebrate a milestone birthday, and was made free to the public.

I wish I could have seen that.  I’m sure it was a once in a lifetime chance.

At the PA National Quilt Extravaganza (held outside of Philadelphia) last year, there was an exhibit of small quilts inspired by the exhibit in New York.  I photographed a lot of them.  I don’t have info on the makers of all these, but they are all from members of the Olde Kent Quilters Repro Bee of Chestertown, MD.

(Many more red and white minis on my Flickr Page)

I have always wanted to own a solid red and white quilt, but I wasn’t sure I would have the patience to make it. I tend to get bored making the same block over and over.  Now as I am getting older I think maybe I would be able to do it.

Like the process might actually be soothing instead of mind-numbing.  I could keep it around for a while and work on it any time I wanted to sew, but not wanted to think.  That’s most nights these days, after the wild things are all tucked away 🙂

Lately I have been seeking out blocks like this one:

It seems so simple, but you can build up complex patterns by spinning them different ways as you assemble the quilt.  I think it would help to keep the construction process interesting, because as you complete more and more blocks, there is the fun of putting them together in different directions to see what patterns you can get.

1

2

3

4

Which layout do you like?  I’m partial to 2 and 3, myself.  2 especially, because I don’t think I’ve ever seen that before.